JEWISH AUTHORSHIP AMONG THE FIFTY TWENTIETH CENTURY WORKS MOST
FREQUENTLY CITED IN THE ARTS & HUMANITIES LITERATURE
 

(44% of works)

JINFO.ORG

What follows is a list of works by scholars and writers who were, or are, Jewish (or of half- or three-quarters-Jewish descent, as noted) that are among the fifty most frequently cited twentieth century works in the arts and humanities literature, according to the Arts & Humanities Citation Index, 1976-1983.  The ranking of each work according to its relative citation frequency is indicated in square brackets.  For more information concerning the methodology employed in the formulation of this list, see http://home.comcast.net/~antaylor1/fiftymostcited.html.
  • [1] Thomas Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions
  • [4] Ludwig Wittgenstein,1 Philosophical Investigations
  • [5] Noam Chomsky, Aspects of the Theory of Syntax
  • [7] Jacques Derrida, Of Grammatology
  • [17] Noam Chomsky and Morris Halle, The Sound Pattern of English
  • [21] Marcel Proust,2 Remembrance of Things Past
  • [22] Ludwig Wittgenstein,1 Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus
  • [25] Claude Lévi-Strauss, Structural Anthropology
  • [26] Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams
  • [30] Saul Kripke, Naming and Necessity
  • [31] Émile Benveniste, Problems in General Linguistics
  • [32] Sir Karl Popper, Conjectures and Refutations: The Growth of Scientific Knowledge
  • [34] Jacques Derrida, Writing and Difference
  • [35] Noam Chomsky, Syntactic Structures
  • [36] Roman Jakobson, Linguistics and Poetics
  • [37] E. D. Hirsch, Jr., Validity in Interpretation
  • [38] Claude Lévi-Strauss, The Savage Mind
  • [40] Peter Berger,3 The Social Construction of Reality: A Treatise in the Sociology of Knowledge
  • [44] Sir Karl Popper, Objective Knowledge: An Evolutionary Approach
  • [46] Erich Auerbach, Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature
  • [47] Sir Ernst Gombrich, Art and Illusion: A Study in the Psychology of Pictorial Representation
  • [50] Sir Karl Popper, The Logic of Scientific Discovery
NOTES
1. Jewish father, half-Jewish mother; see, e.g., Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Duty of Genius, by Ray Monk (Penguin, New York and London, 1990, pp. 4-7).
2. Jewish mother, non-Jewish father.
3. Berger was born to Viennese-Jewish parents who converted to Christianity in 1938.  The family found refuge from the Nazis during World War II in British Mandate Palestine.  See Im Morgenlicht der Erinnerung: Eine Kindheit in turbulenter Zeit, by Peter L. Berger (Molden, Cologne, Germany, 2008).  The co-author of The Social Construction of Reality, Thomas Luckmann, is not Jewish.

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